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    Default June News

    June 15, 2012
    The body of Dr. Timothy V. Jorden, the trauma surgeon suspected of killing his ex-girlfriend Wednesday, was found near his home today with what appeared to be a self-inflicted gunshot wound, officials said.
    Jorden was wearing scrubs when his body was found beside a creek in a wooded area near his Lakeview, N.Y., home. Police said they were able to identify the surgeon by his tattoos, but they declined to specify where he shot himself.
    Jorden, 49, was wanted in connection to the death of his one-time lover, Jackie Wisniewski, 33, a nursing student who died Wednesday morning on the floor of the Erie County Medical Center.
    The trauma surgeon, who also had Army weapons training, was considered armed and dangerous. He was the target of a hunt by local, state and federal authorities, including the U.S. Marshals and the FBI.
    The fatal drama at the hospital began around 8 a.m., when Jorden allegedly shot and killed Wisniewski, a woman identified as his former lover, according to sources familiar with the investigation. She was found dead in a covered passageway joining the hospital's Kidney Center and another wing of the medical center, The Miller Building, WKBW reported.
    Buffalo police, backed up by a New York State Police SWAT team, converged on the hospital and locked down the facility, treating the situation as an active shooter scenario. The lockdown was lifted at noon, but no news emerged as to the circumstances of Jorden, who was officially described as a person of interest.

    Jorden had experienced emotional difficulties recently, according to officials, who did not elaborate.

    A career soldier, Jorden graduated from the University of Buffalo School of Medicine in 1996.

    "I've wanted to be a doctor since early in my military career as a medic," Jorden told the newspaper in a 1996 profile.

    Francisca Wellsbury, who was married to Jorden, but long divorced, told ABC News that she was shocked by the news that her ex-husband had become the suspect in a murder.

    "We've lived separate lives for a long time," Wellsbury, who lives on the West Coast, told ABC News. "I'm just as shocked as anyone. It's traumatic."

    She declined to go into further detail, but said: "This is not the person I knew. I wish he would seek help."

    A decorated soldier, Jorden had a military career that spanned 18 years and two periods of service. During his years of service, he earned numerous medals and commendations including the Army Achievement Medal, Army Commendation Medal, Meritorious Service Medal and Master Parachute Badge Scuba Diver Badge Special Forces Tab. ABC News' Richard Esposito, Jennifer Wlach, Jack Date and Alyssa Newcomb contributed to this report.
    Last edited by Teressa; 06-17-2012 at 03:53:19 AM.

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    Default Re: June News

    June 15, 2012
    The eight men who were allegedly sexually assaulted by former Penn State coach Jerry Sandusky safe guarded their secrets for years, some even as investigators were trying to pry information from them to prosecute the man they claim preyed on them.

    Their kept the stories from their friends, wives and mothers, they testified.

    "How are you supposed to tell your mom something like that?" asked Victim 9 when pressed by Sandusky's lawyer on why he hadn't previously mentioned the tales he told the court of being raped by Sandusky.

    Perhaps the most heart rending example of how difficult it was for these men to speak publicly about what they claim had happened to them came when a man identified as Victim 1 was on the stand. After admitting through tears that he initially denied the attacks to police and how difficult it was for him to speak about them, he was pressed under cross examination by Sandusky's lawyers.

    At one point, Victim 1 got so agitated with the persistent and skeptical questions that he threw his hands to his face, let out a cry, looked at the prosecutor and pleaded, "Make them stop."

    These men were tormented by conflicting feelings of being treated special and being loved as well as shame and fear, experts tell ABCNews.com.

    Sandusky, 68, is charged with sexually assaulting 10 boys over a 15 year period. He has pleaded not guilty and his trial will resume on Monday. If convicted of the charges, he could face life in prison.

    Sandusky's defense team claims the years of silence is an indication that Sandusky is innocent and the men accusing him now are not telling the truth.

    The alleged victims' emotionally wrought testimony has made the jury and court observers cry, and their claims highlight the subtle psychological warfare sexual abusers wage on their victims to keep them from speaking out, psychological experts said.

    "He made me feel like I was a part of a family," said a man identified as Victim 3 who testified Thursday. "He gave me things that I had never had before."


    The eight victims who have told the court Sandusky showered them with gifts such as golf clubs, watches and chances to attend Penn State football games and meet players. Several have testified that they liked Sandusky and didn't want the activities and attention to stop. One even said he loved Sandusky.

    "I didn't want my parents to keep me from going to the games. It felt like something they would get mad about," testified a man identified as Victim 7. "I tried to focus on the positives."

    Feelings of shame and fear haunted the victims for years after the abuse ended. But only one man said Sandusky threatened him not to reveal the abuse. Others kept their secrets willingly, and many had to be coaxed by police to tell their stories when the scandal erupted in 2011.

    "I was scared. I didn't want to tell anyone regardless," said one man as he broke down on the witness stand. "I didn't want to, I didn't know what to do."

    Child psychologists said predators are experts at manipulating children with these tactics, often targeting feelings or characteristics that make children and adolescents especially vulnerable to abuse.

    Dr. Judith Cohen, medical director of the Center for Traumatic Stress in Children and Adolescents at Allegheny General Hospital in Pittsburgh, said children who feel physically or emotionally vulnerable often crave the attention a predator gives them and want to hang on to it, even after bad things start to happen.

    "When a perpetrator gives them that attention, that feeling that they are special, the child often will do what it takes to get that," Cohen said.

    All of the alleged victims met Sandusky through The Second Mile, the charity he founded in 1977 for underprivileged boys. The grand jury indictment claimed that Sandusky selected his alleged victims and began grooming them for sexual abuse through the Second Mile, often targeting those who were from unstable homes or without fathers in their lives.

    "Obviously some of those kids may have wanted a father figure," said Nadine Kaslow, professor and chief psychologist at the Emory University School of Medicine. "For them, getting some attention from an adult may be better than getting no attention."

    Statistically, molesters are usually men who a child knows and trusts. Girls are more likely to be sexually abused than boys. According to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, up to one in six boys will experience some form of sexual abuse before age 18, compared with one in four girls. Though victims of both genders face a certain amount of social stigma, social expectations may impact abused boys in a unique way.

    "In our society, it's much more acceptable for girls to be victims than boys," Cohen said. "That brings up a whole other level of questioning and uncertainty for them."

    Sandusky's alleged victims have reported feeling ashamed and scared to reveal their abuse, but also confused when Sandusky withdrew from their lives. Victim 7 said he was sad when Sandusky stopped calling him and offering to take him to football games.

    "I thought I had did something wrong," the man said. "I was very, very upset by it."

    Those feelings are not uncommon, Cohen said, but they are often balanced by fear when their abusers use threats against them or their families to keep them quiet.

    "Particularly if the abuser is powerful, physically or in terms of their social standing, often the child believes them when they say no one will believe you or no one will help you," Cohen said.
    Experts said it's important for parents, guardians or other adults to let children know that they can and should feel safe speaking up when anyone touches them inappropriately or makes them uncomfortable. Also, having frank, specific conversations about what kinds of touches or activities are not appropriate is important for preventing sexual abuse, especially for children who may be vulnerable.
    But ultimately, Kaslow said factors that may or may not make a child vulnerable to abuse are irrelevant.
    "It doesn't matter what factors the child may bring to the situation, it is never his or her fault or responsibility," she said.
    Last edited by Teressa; 06-17-2012 at 03:52:59 AM.

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    Unhappy Re: June News

    I did think he would take the cowards way out (Dr Jorden), thoughts & prayers for the victims`s family.

  5. The Following User Says Thank You to Patricia For This Useful Post:

    Teressa (06-17-2012)

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    Default Re: June News

    Sadly I agree Patricia. Sad thing is, as a victim of suicide (my father) these cowards take alot to their grave that could provide closure for others

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    Teressa (06-17-2012)

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